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Timeline and resources for the Allied Health Professions

TIMELINE AND RESOURCES FOR GETTING INTO the allied health professions 

Year 10

Year 10

Year 11

Year 11

  • Review pathways and check entry requirements for post 16 options. Some require a relevant subject at A level or Level 3 equivalent e.g. Biology or Applied Science.
  • Weigh the pros and cons of full-time study vs apprenticeship and apply to all the options you are interested in. You can find information about NHS apprenticeships here.
  • Consider a back-up plan if results don't go the way you hoped. This could be level 2 health/care/science courses, intermediate apprenticeships, a job with accredited training/time off for study.

Year 12

Year 12

  • Continue careers research and discuss your ideas with teachers, careers advisers, family and friends, and develop a network of potential contacts for experience, work shadowing, job-study opportunities. The NHS has advice and guidance for those looking at careers in healthcare.
  • Research Higher Education courses (degrees/foundation degrees) on their course pages online, attend open days and compare choices, paying attention to entry requirements, personal statement advice and selection methods.
  • You could also start looking at the government apprenticeship database and job NHS job vacancies and work out what steps you need to take to be able to make good applications for similar opportunities next year i.e. how you can develop relevant skills and experience.
  • Look for NHS work experience opportunities and extra-curricular activities that will help your personal statement.
  • Start following news stories and policies related to health especially those related to the roles you are interested in. This will help broaden your understanding of current issues and prepare for writing applications and interviews.
  • Become familiar with the NHS values and constitution and how you could demonstrate these - the NHS use values-based recruitment so this is really important.

Year 13

Year 13

  • Sept-November: attend open days and finalise choices and personal statements for UCAS application for school/college to add reference and predicted grades for submission by 15 January at the latest. Universities arrange interviews from late autumn so an earlier application can be helpful 
  • December: start looking for degree apprenticeship opportunities, apply and keep a record of your applications 
  • Jan-March: Check UCAS Track for replies from HE providers and prepare for and attend interviews (school/college may provide mock interviews) which may include psychometric and physical tests (eg paramedic) and group tasks 
  • Feb-May: receive offers and add an extra choice if you get no offers 
  • Undergo selection for degree apprenticeships: online and/or in person tests, interviews and group tasks 
  • If unsuccessful, research a backup plan – related degree + postgrad training, alternative healthcare/science career path via apprenticeship/degree apprenticeship or full-time degree, gap year and apply again (consider how you will boost your application) 
  • As an alternative to degree apprenticeship, consider an entry-level job or apprenticeship at Level 2 or 3, to enhance your skills and experience, or foundation degree, HNC/D, or Cert HE (level 4/5 Higher Education courses) at college full or part-time, or via distance learning eg HND Health and Social care 
  • Accept firm and insurance offers (you’ll go to your firm choice if you get the grades they’ve set) by reply deadline (shown in UCAS Track) 
  • Apply for student finance from Feb, preferably by end of May, and any scholarships or awards you may be eligible for eg that the NHS/HE provider offers 
  • Research location, course materials, budgets, travel etc and apply for accommodation (usually around May). If your degree is eligible for the NHS learning support fund (Training grant of £5000 per year of studies), you can usually apply from June.
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